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Switchback Books Advisory Board

Denise Duhamel

Denise Duhamel

Denise Duhamel's most recent poetry titles are Two and Two (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005), Mille et un Sentiments (Firewheel, 2005), Queen for a Day: Selected and New Poems (Pittsburgh, 2001), and The Star-Spangled Banner (Southern Illinois University Press, 1999). Her poetry is at home in such diverse anthologies as Bum Rush the Page; Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poets Cafe; and The Best American Poetry. (She has been included in four issues of the latter--1993, 1994, 1998, 2000, and 2006). Duhamel has read her work on NPR and was a featured poet on the PBS special hosted by Bill Moyers, "Fooling with Words." Booklist has written of Duhamel's poems: "So overwhelming is her relish for life that embarrassment, or titillation when the subject is sexual, just doesn't stand a chance. Life-affirming without being treacly, Duhamel is a character who assures us the world is full of character." She teaches poetry at Florida International University in Miami.

Arielle Greenberg

Arielle Greenberg

Arielle Greenberg is the author of My Kafka Century (Action Books, 2005), Given (Verse, 2002), and the chapbook Fa(r)ther Down: Songs from the Allergy Trials (New Michigan, 2003). Current projects include editing Underground America: Writing on Youth Subculture (Longman Publishers, forthcoming 2006) and co-editing, with Rachel Zucker, an anthology of essays on women poets and mentorship. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in the anthologies Best American Poetry 2004 and 2005, Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, Isn't It Romantic: 100 Love Poems by Younger American Poets and Joyful Noise: an Anthology of American Spiritual Poetry, and in journals including Conjunctions, the Denver Quarterly, and the American Poetry Review. She is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony fellowship and is a former editorial board member for How2: an online journal of innovative women's poetics and current poetry editor for the journal Black Clock. She holds an MFA and certificate in women's studies from Syracuse University. She is an assistant professor in the poetry program at Columbia College Chicago, where she is a co-editor of the poetry journal Court Green. She lives in Evanston, Illinois, with her family.

Joan Larkin

Joan Larkin

Joan Larkin is the author of My Body: New and Selected Poems (Hanging Loose Press, 2007). Her books of poetry include Cold River, A Long Sound, Housework, and Sor Juana's Love Poems, co-translated with Jaime Manrique. She edited the ground-breaking anthologies Amazon Poetry and Lesbian Poetry with Elly Bulkin and Gay and Lesbian Poetry in Our Time with Carl Morse, served as poetry editor for the first three years of the queer literary journal Bloom, and co-edits the Living Out memoir series at University of Wisconsin Press. Her anthology of coming-out stories, A Woman Like That, was nominated for Publishing Triangle and Lambda awards for nonfiction. She has received fellowships in poetry and playwriting from the NEA, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, New York Foundation for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, and the Djerassi Foundation. She is now in her fourth decade of teaching writing. Visit her at www.joanlarkin.com.

Simone Muench

Simone Muench

Simone Muench was raised in Louisiana and Arkansas and now lives in Chicago, IL. She is the author of The Air Lost in Breathing (Marianne Moore Prize for Poetry; Helicon Nine, 2000), Lampblack & Ash (Kathryn A. Morton Prize for Poetry; Sarabande, 2005), and Orange Crush (Sarabande, 2010). Her latest chapbooks are Orange Girl (dancing girl press, 2007) and Sonoluminescence written with Bill Allegrezza (Dusie Press, 2007). She also works collaboratively with Philip Jenks, writing a book of epistolary poems titled Little Visceral Carnival. She is a recipient of an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry, the PSA's Fine Lines Contest, the Charles Goodnow Award, the AWP Intro Journals Project Award, the Poetry Center's 9th Annual Juried Reading Award, the Frederick Stern Award for Teaching, and the PSA's Bright Lights/Big Verse Contest. She received her PhD from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and is director of the Writing Program at Lewis University where she teaches creative writing and film studies. Currently, she serves on the advisory board for UniVerse: A United Nations of Poetry and is an editor for Sharkforum. She is a vegetarian and a horror film fan. Visit simonemuench.com.

Carol Muske-Dukes

Carol Muske-Dukes

Carol Muske-Dukes is author of seven books of poetry, most recently Sparrow, a National Book Award finalist (Random House, 2003). Her other books of poetry are An Octave Above Thunder, New & Selected Poems (Penguin, 1997). Her three novels are Life After Death (Random House, 2001), Saving St. Germ (Penguin, 1993), and Dear Digby (Viking, 1989). Dear Digby has been re-issued by Figueroa Press in 2003. Her fourth novel, Channeling Mark Twain, is forthcoming from Random House in 2007. Carol's collection of essays entitled Married to the Icepick Killer, A Poet in Hollywood was published in August of 2002. Her collection of reviews and critical essays, Women and Poetry: Truth, Autobiography and the Shape of the Self was published in the "Poets on Poetry" series of the University of Michigan Press, 1997. Both collections have been "New York Times Most Notable Books" or listed in the current year's "Best Books." She is a regular critic for the New York Times Book Review and the LA Times Book Review. Her work appears everywhere from the New Yorker to L.A. Magazine, and she is anthologized widely, including in Best American Poems, 100 Great Poems by Women, and many others. She is professor of English and Creative Writing and founding Director of the new PhD Program in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California. She has received many awards and honors, including a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, an Ingram-Merrill, the Witter Bynner award from the Library of Congress, the Castagnola award from the Poetry Society of America, and several Pushcart Prizes. Carol will be taking a year-long leave of absence from USC in 2005-2006, as well as from her regular monthly poetry column in the LA Times Book Review, Poets' Corner. She will be living in NYC in the West Village.

Patty Seyburn

Patty Seyburn

Patty Seyburn has published two books of poems: Mechanical Cluster (Ohio State University Press, 2002) and Diasporadic (Helicon Nine Editions, 1998) which won the 1997 Marianne Moore Poetry Prize and the American Library Association's Notable Book Award for 2000. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals, including The Paris Review, New England Review, Field, Slate, Crazyhorse, Cutbank, Quarterly West, Bellingham Review, Connecticut Review, Cimarron Review, Third Coast, Gulf Coast, Poetry East, Passages North, Seneca Review, Mudfish, and Western Humanities Review. Her poems have been anthologized in Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century (Sarabande Books, 2005), Chance of a Ghost (Helicon Nine Editions, 2005), American Poetry: The Next Generation (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2000), and American Diaspora: Poetry of Exile (University of Iowa Press, 2000). She grew up in Detroit, earned a BS and MS in Journalism from Northwestern University, an MFA in Poetry from University of California, Irvine, and a PhD in Poetry and Literature from the University of Houston. She has taught writing and literature courses at the University of Southern California, California Institute of the Arts, University of Houston, and University of California, Irvine. She's written the lyrics for a musical based on J.B. Priestly's Lost Empires, poetry reviews for Slope and International Poetry Review, and is co-editor of POOL: A Journal of Poetry, based in Los Angeles. She is an assistant professor of English and Creative Writing at California State University, Long Beach.